Difference between revisions of "Complementizer (definition)"

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Complementizers are particles that introduce [[Embedded Clause (definition)|embedded clauses]]. In English these include ''that'', ''if'' and ''whether''. In Gaelic, ''gu'', ''nach'', ''ma'' and some forms of ''a'' are all complementizers. In traditional grammars these are sometimes called "subordinators" or "subordinating conjunctions".
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*gun
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*gur
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*nach
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*a (relative)
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*ged a "although", takes relative future.
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*far a "where"
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*gus a "until"
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*anns a bheil "in which"
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==See Also==
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*[[Functional Categories (definition)]]
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*[[Conjunction (definition)]]
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==External Links==
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The link below takes you away from the Gaelic Wiki to Wikipedia. Since wikipedia pages can be edited by anyone, they often contain inaccurate information. So be careful!
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*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complementizer
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*http://www.sil.org/linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsAComplementizer.htm
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==References==
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*Matthews, P. H. (1997) ''The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics.'' Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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[[Category: Technical Definitions]]
 
[[Category: Technical Definitions]]
[[Category:Functional Categories]]
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[[Category: Functional Categories]]
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[[Category: Parts of Speech]]

Latest revision as of 20:11, 2 August 2012

Complementizers are particles that introduce embedded clauses. In English these include that, if and whether. In Gaelic, gu, nach, ma and some forms of a are all complementizers. In traditional grammars these are sometimes called "subordinators" or "subordinating conjunctions".

  • gun
  • gur
  • nach
  • a (relative)
  • ged a "although", takes relative future.
  • far a "where"
  • gus a "until"
  • anns a bheil "in which"

See Also

External Links

The link below takes you away from the Gaelic Wiki to Wikipedia. Since wikipedia pages can be edited by anyone, they often contain inaccurate information. So be careful!

References

  • Matthews, P. H. (1997) The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.