Difference between revisions of "Pharyngeal (definition)"

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Pharyngeal is a place of articulation, wherein sounds are achieved by pushing the tongue root near the pharynx. In the International Phonetic Alphabet, they are rare and contain only voiced and unvoiced pharyngeal fricatives. The symbols of these sounds are [ħ] and [ʕ] and they are not found in Scottish Gaelic.
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==See Also==
 
==See Also==
 
*[[Velar (definition)]]
 
*[[Velar (definition)]]
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*[[Place of Articulation (definition)]]
 
*[[Place of Articulation (definition)]]
 
*[[Consonant (definition)]]
 
*[[Consonant (definition)]]
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*[[Sounds of Scottish Gaelic]]
  
 
==External Links==
 
==External Links==
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The link below takes you away from the Gaelic Wiki to Wikipedia. Since wikipedia pages can be edited by anyone, they often contain inaccurate information. So be careful!
 
*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pharyngeal_consonant
 
*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pharyngeal_consonant
 
*[http://www.paulmeier.com/ipa/charts.html Interactive IPA Charts]
 
*[http://www.paulmeier.com/ipa/charts.html Interactive IPA Charts]
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[[Category: Technical Definitions]]
 
[[Category: Technical Definitions]]
 
[[Category: Phonetics]]
 
[[Category: Phonetics]]
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[[Category: Places of Articulation]]

Revision as of 19:39, 15 June 2012

Pharyngeal is a place of articulation, wherein sounds are achieved by pushing the tongue root near the pharynx. In the International Phonetic Alphabet, they are rare and contain only voiced and unvoiced pharyngeal fricatives. The symbols of these sounds are [ħ] and [ʕ] and they are not found in Scottish Gaelic.

See Also

External Links

The link below takes you away from the Gaelic Wiki to Wikipedia. Since wikipedia pages can be edited by anyone, they often contain inaccurate information. So be careful!

References

  • Crystal, David. (1997) A Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.
  • Ladefoged, Peter (1993) A Course in Phonetics Third Edition. London: Harcourt Press.
  • Matthews, P. H. (1997) The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.